[Verified Ans]When an incident expands

When an incident expands ________________________________.

When an incident expands

 A. only the functions and positions necessary are filled. 

B. all functions of the Command and General Staff are filled and the entire list of elements within each Section. 

C. functions and positions remain the same throughout the incident regardless of expansion. 

D. all functions of the Command and General Staff must be filled.

When an incident expands, option B is correct: all functions of the Command and General Staff are filled and the entire list of elements within each Section.

As per the National Incident Management System (NIMS), an incident expands when the complexity of the incident increases or when the incident area or scope of the incident broadens. In such cases, the organization expands by filling all functions of the Command and General Staff, and the entire list of elements within each Section. This allows the organization to effectively manage the expanded incident and ensure a coordinated response. The NIMS emphasizes the importance of flexible organizational structures that can expand or contract based on the needs of the incident.

Expanding Incidents FEMA ICS 200

When an incident occurs, it is important to quickly assess the situation and determine the level of response needed to effectively manage the incident. At the initial stages of an incident, it may be managed with a small team, and the span of control may be appropriate with one supervisor overseeing a few subordinates. However, as the incident expands, the number of resources needed increases, and the scope of the incident grows, it may become challenging to maintain an appropriate span of control.

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To manage an expanding incident effectively, the incident management organization may need to activate additional Teams, Units, Divisions, Groups, Branches, or Sections. Each of these elements has a defined span of control, which allows for effective communication and coordination of resources. For example, a Division may consist of several Teams or Groups, each with its own supervisor who reports to the Division Supervisor. This structure helps ensure that everyone involved in the incident knows their role and responsibilities and that communication flows smoothly up and down the chain of command.

The optimal span of control for incident management is generally considered to be one supervisor to five subordinates, but this is only a guideline. The actual ratio required may vary depending on the complexity of the incident, the number of resources available, and other factors. The most important thing is to ensure that the span of control is appropriate to manage the incident effectively.

Delegating the supervision of resources not only frees up the Incident Commander to perform critical decision-making and evaluation duties, but also clearly defines the lines of communication to everyone involved in the incident. This ensures that all involved parties are aware of their roles and responsibilities and that communication is clear and effective. Ultimately, the goal is to manage the incident in the most efficient and effective way possible to achieve the best outcome for all involved.

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FAQs

What is an expanding incident?

An expanding incident is an incident that increases in scope or complexity, requiring additional resources and an expanded incident management organization to manage it effectively.

Why is it important to activate additional resources for an expanding incident?

Activating additional resources allows for an appropriate span of control, which ensures that resources are properly managed and coordinated. It also ensures that communication is clear and effective, and that everyone involved in the incident is aware of their roles and responsibilities.

What is the optimal span of control for incident management?

The optimal span of control for incident management is generally considered to be one supervisor to five subordinates, but this may vary depending on the complexity of the incident and the number of resources available.

What is the role of the Incident Commander in an expanding incident?

The Incident Commander is responsible for overall incident management, including coordinating resources, making critical decisions, and ensuring that communication is clear and effective. As the incident expands, the Incident Commander may need to delegate some responsibilities to other members of the incident management organization.

How does the incident management organization expand to manage an expanding incident?

The incident management organization may expand by activating additional Teams, Units, Divisions, Groups, Branches, or Sections, depending on the needs of the incident. Each of these elements has a defined span of control, which ensures that resources are properly managed and coordinated, and that communication is clear and effective.

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